Based upon radiometric dating the age of the earth is scammer dating profiles

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The graphic below gives the general idea, and more technical detail can be found here. As with any experimental procedure in any field of science, measurements are subject to certain “glitches” and “anomalies”, as noted in the literature.

The overall reliability of radiometric dating was addressed in some detail in a recent book by Brent Dalrymple, an expert in the field.

The phenomenon of radioactivity is rooted in the fundamental laws of physics and follows simple mathematical formulae, taught to all calculus students.

Dating schemes based on rates of radioactivity have been refined and scrutinised over several decades, and the latest high-tech equipment permits reliable results to be obtained even with microscopic rock samples.

Radiometric dating, as with any other experimental discipline, is subject to a variety of errors, ranging from human error to rare anomalies resulting from highly unusual natural circumstances.

But while errors and anomalies can occur, the burden of proof is not on scientists to fully account for each and every error.

Dalrymple also notes scientists do not rely solely on the self-checking nature of radiometric dating to confirm their results.And in another effort to calculate the age of the planet, scientists turned to the rocks that cover its surface.However, because plate tectonics constantly changes and revamps the crust, the first rocks have long since been recycled, melted down and reformed into new outcrops.Scientists also must battle an issue called the Great Unconformity, which is where sedimentary layers of rock appear to be missing (at the Grand Canyon, for example, there's 1.2 billion years of rock that can't be found).There are multiple explanations for this uncomformity; in early 2019, one study suggested that a global ice age caused glaciers to grind into the rock, causing it to disintegrate.

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